Remote sensing of terrestrial vegetation

High Sierra near Mammoth Lakes, CA shows vegetated and nonvegetated surfaces.

A novel approach developed by the Berry Lab is opening a new window for remote sensing of terrestrial vegetation on incompletely vegetated surfaces across the planet. For decades scientists have been trying to use remote sensing based on reflectance to learn about properties of the vegetation. But the reflectance approach has been thwarted over most of the globe by contaminating light from non-vegetated components of the scenes. These components can include soils, dead vegetation, snow, aerosols and sub-pixel clouds - all of which also reflect sunlight back to space. The new approach is able to identify and measure the fraction of the near infrared light reflected from a scene that has interacted with the vegetation. It is as if the vegetation of the planet can now be viewed with a uniform background of black soil. A new paper by Zeng et al., uses this approach to provide new information needed to interpret measurements of solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence from space.

Fundamental new insights from Yelu Zeng and Grayson Badgley formed the foundation of the paper. It draws on work from the Berry Lab and that of Youngrel Ryu,a recent sabbatical visitor from S. Korea.  

A practical approach for estimating the escape ratio of near-infrared solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence SIF measurements.

Zeng, Y., Badgley, G., Dechant, B., Ryu, Y., Chen, M., & Berry, J. A. (2019). A practical approach for estimating the escape ratio of near-infrared solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence. Remote Sensing of Environment, 111209. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.rse.2019.05.028

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